JOB SATISFACTION OF TEACHER EDUCATORS IN RELATION TO THEIR ATTITUDE TOWARDS TEACHING

 

Gurmit Singh

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

A teacher, who is happy with his job, plays a pivotal role in the upliftment of society. Well adjusted and satisfied teacher can contribute a lot to the well being of his/her pupils. A dissatisfied teacher can become irritable and may create tensions which can have negative influence on the studentsí learning process and it consequently affects their academic growth. Job satisfaction implies the overall adjustment to work situation.Attitude is readiness to react towards or against some situation, person or thing in a particular manner. The attitudes, ideas, feelings and interests of a child are influenced by the organization of his/her family, thinking of parents and customs of the society. Personality of parents, their education and their behaviour towards the children is the basis of development of attitudes. Teachers having favourable attitude towards their profession are generally successful, properly adjusted and well satisfied with their job. Conducting a study on the secondary school teachers of Bangalore city Umme (1999) concluded that attitude towards teaching correlated positively and significantly with their job-satisfaction.

 

OBJECTIVES

1. To compare the job satisfaction of teacher educators with their attitude towards teaching;

2. To compare the job satisfaction of male teacher educators with their attitude towards teaching;

3. To compare the job satisfaction of female teacher educators with their attitude towards teaching.

 

HYPOTHESES

1. There is positive and significant relationship between job satisfaction and attitude towards teaching among teacher educators;

2. There is positive and signification relationship between job satisfaction and attitude towards teaching among male teacher educators;

3. There is positive and significant relationship between job satisfaction and attitude towards teaching among female teacher educators.

 

METHOD

The study was descriptive survey type.

 

Sample†††††††††††

The sample comprised of 250 teacher educators with 100 male and 150 female teachers educators from 20 Colleges of Education affiliated to Panjab University, Chandigarh, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar and Punjabi University, Patiala.

 

Tools

1. Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS) by Amar Singh and T.R. Sharma (1999) revised version;

2. Teacher Attitude Inventory by S.P. Ahluwalia (1998) revised version.

 

 

Statistical Techniques

Product moment correlation technique was used to find the relation between job satisfaction and attitude towards teaching.

 

RESULTS

Product moment correlations were worked out between job satisfaction and attitude towards teaching. The value of correlation between job satisfaction and attitude towards teaching was 0.0456, which was not significant. This leads to the partial confirmation of hypotheses 1. Hence, job satisfaction of teacher educators thus is positively but not significantly related to attitude towards teaching. The value of correlation between job satisfaction and attitude towards teaching was 0.123, which was positive but not significant. Thus, the hypothesis 2 was partially accepted. Hence, job satisfaction of male teacher educators is positively but not significantly related to attitude towards teaching. The value of correlation between job satisfaction and attitude towards teaching was 0.0034 which was positive but not significant, which leads to the partial confirmation of hypothesis 3. Thus, relation between job satisfaction and attitude towards teaching of female teacher educators is positive but not significant.

 

CONCLUSION†††††††††

The job satisfaction of teacher educators was positively but not significantly related to their attitude towards teaching. The job satisfaction of male and female teacher educators was also positively but not significantly related to their attitude towards teaching.

 

REFERENCE

Umme, K.†† (1999) A factor analytic study of job involvement of secondary school teachers in Bangalore city. Experiments in Education 28, 9 , 159-163, September.